Blog Entry

3 to Watch: The Bud Selig edition

Posted on: July 13, 2011 2:25 pm
Edited on: July 13, 2011 2:42 pm
 
No matter what you think of Bud Selig as a commissioner, there's never been any doubt about Bud Selig as a fan.

He loves baseball. He loves watching baseball.

He switches from game to game on television every night when he's home. And when Selig met with the Baseball Writers Association of America this week, he said that his favorite games this summer have involved the Pirates and the Indians.

"I go first to the Pittsburgh game, and then Cleveland," Selig said. "I'm enjoying those two situations very much."

It's easy to see why. Not only are the Pirates and Indians great stories, but Selig sees them both as great examples of how his financial (revenue-sharing) plan is working.

He's right. They're great stories.

As to whether they're proof that the system works, that's a lot more complicated. Selig would also argue that the Rays have proved the system works, because they've finished first two of the last three years in baseball's toughest (and most expensive) division.

Rays executives would dispute that. They say there's no way they can compete long-term against the financial resources of the Yankees and Red Sox, and they beg regularly for a realignment plan that would get them out of the American League East (not going to happen).

Indians people wonder whether they can sustain long-term success. Even with Cleveland's success on the field this year (the Indians spent much of the first half in first place), attendance at Progressive Field has been mostly disappointing.

The Indians could win again, but they could also eventually find themselves back where they were in 2008-09, where they felt forced to trade Cy Young winners in back-to-back years, because they couldn't afford to keep them.

The Rays, despite another competitive team, had the second lowest average attendance in baseball (19,115, ahead of only the Marlins) in the first half. The Indians, at 21,106, ranked 26th among the 30 teams. The Pirates, at 23,577, were 21st.

Does the system really work?

Ask again in a few years.

On to 3 to watch:

1. The Indians fell out of first place on Sunday, and they'll begin the second half with two starters (Fausto Carmona and Mitch Talbot on the disabled list). But they also begin the second half with four games against a Baltimore team that might have been the worst in baseball at the end of the first half. And they start with the outstanding Justin Masterson on the mound, in Indians at Orioles, Thursday night (7:05 ET) at Camden Yards. Jeremy Guthrie, who will no doubt be the subject of trade talks later this month, starts for the Orioles.

2. Selig is a traditionalist in many ways, but he's also a businessman. So when someone asked Tuesday whether he sees a chance of more scheduled doubleheaders, he quickly said no. He's right, there's no way most teams would give up a home date (and a potential big gate), for doubleheaders that most fans wouldn't attend, anyway. The A's are different, because they have trouble selling tickets. So they did schedule a doubleheader, in Angels at A's, Saturday (4:05 ET) at the Coliseum. American League All-Star starter Jered Weaver is scheduled to start one of the games for the Angels.

3. Did the Pirates play the Astros every day during the first half, and is that why they had a decent record? It's not true. The Astros and Pirates played only nine times in the first half (with the Pirates winning seven), which means they play nine times in the second half, too. Three of those come this weekend, including Pirates at Astros, Sunday (2:05 ET) at Minute Maid Park, with All-Star Kevin Correia on the mound.


Comments

Since: Dec 2, 2011
Posted on: February 19, 2012 11:39 am
 

3 to Watch: The Bud Selig edition

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Since: Dec 2, 2011
Posted on: January 14, 2012 4:28 am
 

3 to Watch: The Bud Selig edition



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Since: Dec 2, 2011
Posted on: January 12, 2012 12:09 pm
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Since: Dec 2, 2011
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3 to Watch: The Bud Selig edition

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Since: Oct 21, 2011
Posted on: October 21, 2011 7:36 pm
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Posted on: October 12, 2011 6:13 am
 

3 to Watch: The Bud Selig edition

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Since: Jan 3, 2010
Posted on: July 13, 2011 6:01 pm
 

3 to Watch: The Bud Selig edition

Cut Knobler some slack.  He's writing stuff worth reading and responding to.  That's what bloggers are supposed to do.



Since: Dec 27, 2007
Posted on: July 13, 2011 3:35 pm
 

3 to Watch: The Bud Selig edition

"He loves baseball. He loves watching baseball."


Uh no. One, if he loves it so much, why did he sit idly by while steroids destroyed the sport? Also why did he cancel an entire season?


Selig is a traditionalist in many ways, but he's also a businessman.
 Yeah, a traditionalist who destroyed the sport by allowing drug-use? A traditionalist who ended a season when even WW II couldn't?  He's no traditionalist? He's a milquetoast who has ruined the sport, because he has no clue what it is really about.

The only traditionalist here is Knobler. He's traditionally bad.


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