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Blog Entry

First we watch, then we hope

Posted on: August 21, 2010 10:00 pm
Edited on: August 21, 2010 10:24 pm
 
They panned the Phillies dugout during the first inning of Saturday's game against the Nationals. As Tom McCarthy and Chris Wheeler noted on the Phillies telecast, every player seemed intently focused on the guy on the mound for Washington.

Roy Halladay. Roy Oswalt. Jayson Werth. All of them.

Stephen Strasburg attracts that kind of attention, that kind of respect, even at age 21, even three months into his major-league career.

They all want to see him. We all want to see him.

And once again tonight, for the second time in four weeks, we're all hoping that Strasburg isn't seriously hurt.

He walked off the mound in the fifth inning of the game against the Phillies, wincing in pain after his final pitch, then looking down at his valuable right arm.

Perhaps it isn't that serious. The Nationals announced after the game that Strasburg has a strained flexor tendon in his right forearm, and that he'll have an MRI done on Sunday.

At the least, it's a reminder of what we always say, how any pitch can be the last one. It's why we always try to qualify every prediction of greatness by adding "if he stays healthy."

It's why you can't blame Strasburg for holding out for a $15.1 million guaranteed contract before signing with the Nationals last summer. It's why we always mention guys like Mark Prior, who was an 18-game winner and Cy Young candidate at age 22, then out of the game three years later.

It's why the Nationals were so cautious last month, when Strasburg said he had trouble getting loose while warming up for a start against the Braves. They held him out for two weeks, then allowed him to return 11 days ago. The start Saturday was his third since returning to the rotation.

Saturday, he was as impressive as ever. The fastball was 97-98 mph, the curve looked unhittable, and he was throwing everything for strikes. In 4 1/3 innings, he had allowed the Phillies just two hits.

You can bet they were impressed. You can bet that they'll say Strasburg lived up to the hype.

And you can bet they'll say they hope he's OK.


Category: MLB
Comments

Since: Dec 2, 2011
Posted on: February 20, 2012 10:17 am
 

First we watch, then we hope




Since: Dec 2, 2011
Posted on: January 14, 2012 9:41 pm
 

First we watch, then we hope




Since: Nov 19, 2011
Posted on: December 23, 2011 9:49 pm
 

First we watch, then we hope




Since: Dec 2, 2011
Posted on: December 5, 2011 4:34 pm
 

First we watch, then we hope




Since: Nov 19, 2011
Posted on: December 3, 2011 10:02 pm
 

First we watch, then we hope




Since: Dec 2, 2011
Posted on: December 3, 2011 5:10 pm
 

First we watch, then we hope

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Tomly
Since: Oct 21, 2011
Posted on: October 22, 2011 9:18 am
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Since: Oct 7, 2011
Posted on: October 19, 2011 2:51 am
 

First we watch, then we hope

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First we watch, then we hope

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Since: Dec 20, 2007
Posted on: August 27, 2010 1:01 pm
 

First we watch, then we hope

I like how people Blame Dusty Baker for Prior AND Wood's injuries.  I can see why people say Prior but Wood's injury problems started with da-da-daaaa... Riggleman not Baker.  However, I don't believe managers are to blame for injuries to pitchers because like what others here have said some guys just have better MECHANICS and stronger arms than others, and others are just freaks of nature.  Halladay throws like 250 innings a year and really hasn'r had too many injury problems in his career.  Nolan Ryan threw like 130-140 pitches regularly and he rarely sat out with an injury.  Also look at what Maddux and Moyer have done in their careers.  Both pitched into their 40s effectively and one is still pitching (on the DL but still on a team). I think the advent of unnecessary stats in baseball that has occurred over the last decade and a half where just about everything under the sun is recorded as a stat now has bearing on injuries.  Let me explain, before pitch counts were taken seriously minor leaguers and college kids would throw as many pitches to get the job done.  Nowadays though the pitch count that fans take so seriously for some reason has put stress on managers and GMs to baby their prospects.  So instead of going out and pitching a game in college or the minor leagues and doing what is necessary to get an out even if it takes 10 pitches they start worrying about their pitch count because pitchers even at the college level are on pitch counts nowadays.  Then if they make it to the majors when they are in a situation to throw more than 80-90 pitches (which is generally what the pitch count limit is set at at lower levels of play) their arms implode because they're not used to it.  I wish people would just shut up about pitch counts and let the kids in the minors and college play.  If they blow their arms out at that level then no one cares and the MLB just wasn't in the cards for them.  Ask any MLB pitcher from the 60's to the early 80's and they'll tell you that in their day pitch counts didn't exist and is probably the most overrated stat in the game right now.  Fergie Jenkins said that on more than one occasion he has thrown over 150 pitches in a game.  Look how his career turned out.


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