Blog Entry

You'll tell your grandkids that you saw him play

Posted on: June 2, 2010 8:44 pm
 
My grandmother was never a baseball fan, but she did like to tell people that she once went to see Babe Ruth play.

Needless to say, I never saw Ruth. But I did see Ken Griffey Jr., and I do find it somehow appropriate that 75 years to the day after Ruth announced his retirement, Griffey announced his.

He was a great player, maybe the best I've seen in 20-plus years covering the major leagues. He was a great showman, maybe the best I've seen at that, too. He wasn't always perfect, and his career didn't end without some controversy.

But neither did Ruth's.

The day Ruth retired, the New York Times said that Braves manager Bill McKechnie had asked the team to release him a few days earlier. Ruth, according to the account, "said he had been 'double-crossed'" by club president Emil E. Fuchs. He announced that he would ask to go on the voluntarily retired list, and the Braves released him.

Oh, and Ruth was hitting .181 at the time.

Years later, we don't remember how it ended. We remember the Babe, the home runs, the legends.

Just as we'll remember Griffey's home runs, his catches, and the 1995 slide across home plate that beat the Yankees in the playoffs and saved baseball in Seattle. We'll remember that through the 1990s, there wasn't a better all-around player in the game. There wasn't a more exciting player in the game.

We'll remember the day he played in the Mariners outfield alongside his father, and the day he returned to the Mariners so that he could end his career where it began.

"I was raised in Cincinnati," Griffey said last spring. "But I grew up here."

"He IS the Seattle Mariners," Jay Buhner told the Seattle Times that week.

Griffey is the Mariners, but he's more than that.

If you saw him play, you didn't forget him.

And some day, you'll be telling your grandkids.
Category: MLB
Comments

Since: Dec 2, 2011
Posted on: February 20, 2012 12:48 pm
 

You'll tell your grandkids that you saw him play




Since: Dec 2, 2011
Posted on: January 15, 2012 12:22 am
 

You'll tell your grandkids that you saw him play

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Since: Dec 2, 2011
Posted on: December 31, 2011 2:43 am
 

You'll tell your grandkids that you saw him play

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Since: Dec 2, 2011
Posted on: December 5, 2011 7:26 pm
 

You'll tell your grandkids that you saw him play




Since: Nov 19, 2011
Posted on: December 4, 2011 12:46 am
 

You'll tell your grandkids that you saw him play



Tomly
Since: Oct 21, 2011
Posted on: October 22, 2011 11:33 am
This comment has been removed.

Post Deleted by Administrator




Since: Oct 7, 2011
Posted on: October 13, 2011 5:55 am
 

You'll tell your grandkids that you saw him play




Since: Oct 7, 2011
Posted on: October 13, 2011 12:41 am
 

You'll tell your grandkids that you saw him play

Let us hope this just disappears entirely. On the other hand, which will motivation the Vikings to get started on attaining and I do not like that both equally.



Since: Mar 6, 2010
Posted on: June 4, 2010 7:28 am
 

You'll tell your grandkids that you saw him play

He was my favorite player growing up not only because he is a fellow lefty,
but just how he played the game and always looked like he was having the time
of his life out there.  I hope my children will understand what he meant to the game
 and if not for that strike season of 1994 he might have beaten the single season
home run long before sosa and mcgwire did.  He had the most perfect swing which
I try to teach but you cannot teach greatness.  I wish he had stayed healthy enough
to go for the homerun title, but that is why you play the game and he played it better
than anyone



Since: Feb 9, 2009
Posted on: June 3, 2010 1:47 pm
 

You'll tell your grandkids that you saw him play

In a bit of symmetry, my son was 14 years old when he saw Griffey during his rookie year; my grandson just saw him in Spring Training this year, also at 14 years old.  He was one of the most enjoyable players to watch since Willie Mays, and has always kept baseball just what it is; A GAME! 


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